Royal Crescent Birthday Celebrations

We had a great time at the Royal Crescent foundation stone celebration on Sunday.  Sunshine, sandwiches, plenty of willing helpers to pump the bellows and lots of nice people to talk to … And most importantly the opportunity to show how the finials on the Royal Crescent railings would have been made 250 years ago (except that perhaps the bellows wouldn’t have been quite so leaky).  James even had his moment of fame on BBC Points West!

Royal Crescent 250 6 20170521_123314Royal Crescent 250 120170521_132313

 

Gateway to the Chateau D’Oiron

Here at Ironart we are very fortunate to see and be involved in some amazing commissions, but once in a while the opportunity to be part of something very special comes our way.

Earlier this year we were asked if we could produce a pair of traditionally made gates for a private Wiltshire residence.Gough

Why so special? Because these were to be an exact replica of the main gates to the 16th Century Chateau D’Oiron located in Oiron, in the Deux-Sèvres department of Western France –the backdrop for Charles Perrault‘s fairy tale, Puss in Boots.

Chateau d'Oiron May 2015 084Beautifully crafted, highly ornate and standing 4-metres tall, with a 4-metre opening, the gates have been and continue to be (quite literally!) a big feature in the workshop, with Jason and the team working hard to ensure that every detail and specific original features of the gates are spot on.

The gates are forged in very heavy mild steel sections consisting of 45mm² hinge stiles, 45mm² top and bottom rails, all with upset ends and forged tenons. Incorporating numerous horizontal rails of 45x20mm – also with forged tenons – the gates feature  numerous scrolled sections made from 40x15mm and 40x12mm flatbars, all forge-welded and formed hot.

With all the component parts made and assembled, work continues apace!

Here are a just a few photos of the gates in the workshop from the very early stages. We’ll keep you posted with progress and pictures over the coming weeks.

Scrollwork within horizontal mid rails  Firewelding of scrolls     Scroll forming

Regency walled garden gates

We blogged about the making and restoration of these three traditional wrought iron kitchen garden gates a few weeks ago. Please follow this link to read all about it.

We now have some pictures of them in situ and they look truly stunning. If you would like to talk to us about wrought iron gate restoration, or have a new commission in mind, please get in touch.

 

 

 

 

 

Restoration of the gates at Burwalls House, Clifton

We are delighted to have been commissioned to restore the lovely main gates and other ironwork from historic Burwalls House in Bristol.

Burwalls Estate is located in Leigh Woods, a residential suburb lying approximately 2.5 miles west of the city and overlooking Bristol’s iconic landmark Clifton Suspension bridge. The estate comprises of a Grade II listed Jacobean baronial style house built in 1872 by Joseph Leech a local entrepreneur and owner of the Bristol Times and Mirror, alongside a range of annexe buildings and a detached lodge.

Burwalls was requisitioned by the War Office in 1939 and used as the HQ of the Heavy Anti Aircraft Regiment, before being purchased by the University of Bristol in 1948.

Here are some pics of the gates arriving earlier this week – more news on this when we start work on them.

 

 

Installation of the restored Wincanton Gates

We finally got back on site to reinstate the magificent set of entrance gates from a large country house near Wincanton, that were restored earlier in 2013.

Martin and Andy travelled to site to install them. We also supplied a new cattle grid to sit underneath the gates.

 

Restoration of an Orangery

In 2012/13 we worked on a stunning orangery in Wiltshire. The tie bar plates had rotted away at the base of the arches supporting the glass roof.  The original wrought iron sheet was rivetted, the team had to cut the rivets out remove them and make an accurate template using one good one. The team then had to shape, drill and bend a flange on the new plates; both right and left handed. They were then reattached in situ, ready to receive the new glass roof.

There will be more images to post on this project when it’s complete. If you have a similar heritage ironwork restoration project and would like some advice on where to start, please get in touch because we’d love to help.