BathIRON 2018

Save the date! An absolute must for your 2018 diary…Thursday, 14th June to Sunday, 17th June when the NHIG’s first major event will take place in the World Heritage City of Bath…

BathIRON will be a unique event aimed at heritage professionals and craft practitioners from all over the world, as well as the general public, with the principal aim of celebrating and raising awareness of one of our neglected national treasures – the country’s wealth of Historic Ironwork.

BathIRON

Supported by the British Artist Blacksmiths Association (BABA) and the Institute of Conservation (ICON), BathIRON will consist of a rare opportunity to attend a two-day Historic Ironwork Conference, to be held at Bath’s Grade 1 listed Guildhall, and a four-day Festival of Ironwork in elegant Parade Gardens.

The NHIG is committed to the preservation of historic ironwork – championing and educating those who care for it, inspiring a new generation to develop traditional ironworking skills and raising awareness of its precarious position as a frequently overlooked aspect of our built heritage.

In keeping with its mission to safeguard the future of heritage ironwork, the NHIG will be staging this large-scale public forging event, providing a unique opportunity to witness Master Blacksmiths and their teams at work as a stunning new balustrade for the bandstand is forged live. Bespoke in design and befitting its historic surroundings, the balustrade will be made using traditional skills, creating a wonderful legacy for future generations.

If you would like to become involved in the event yourself or know of anyone else who might want to support BathIRON, do contact the NHIG direct on 07503 764712 or at info@nhig.org.uk.

For more information, go to BathIRON 2018

Help to forge Bath’s future heritage!

Ironart attends NHIG’s inaugural best practice seminar

Keeping up to date with best practice is a vital part of our ongoing training here at Ironart, so we were delighted to attend the NHIG’s first seminar on the Cleaning, Protection and Coating of Historic Ironwork at the Rural Crafts Centre in Hereford, a few weeks ago.

With around 50 delegates participating from as far afield as Scotland, London and the South Coast the seminar covered three key areas:

Current Cleaning Methods and their Effects, The Effects of Environment on Corrosion and Current Corrosion Control Methods and Historic and Contemporary coatings, their advantages and disadvantages /methods of application.

During the short presentations given, differing treatments were covered with each speaker outlining the relative pro’s and cons. Delegates were then given the opportunity to question, comment and debate on the subject areas covered during the day.

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Andy from Ironart who attended said:

“Getting together with fellow blacksmiths, specialist conservators, architects, the heritage trust and students in a forum like this provides a fantastic opportunity to listen to experts in the subject and then debate – quite vigorously as it turned out! –  the issues and methods involved in cleaning, protecting and coating heritage ironwork. Those who came along agreed that the seminar was a huge step forward in developing best practice advice and guidance for everyone in the field, including practitioners, specifiers and commissioners.”

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Notes were taken of the outcomes which will inform the content for future guidance and advice produced by the NHIG.

Andy said:

“As NHIG Secretary I’d like to thank Hereford & Ludlow College for hosting the event and to everyone who attended. Well done also to the NHIG team and speakers for making this such an informative and interesting inaugural event.”

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Over the next year or so the NHIG will be organising a series of seminars and master classes covering other areas of interest and concern regarding ironwork conservation. With the intention of promoting communication and understanding between  owners, specifiers and conservation professionals and also making available a resource base of information and technical advice on the care and preservation of our heritage ironwork. For updates and latest news, go to www.nhig.org.uk

Historic Ironwork – open workshops & lecture

We are hosting an Open Workshops event on Tuesday 5th May 2015.

We will be hosting two sessions that day. 10am – 12noon or 2pm -4pm. Come and take a look around our forge, meet the team and find out more about our bespoke and restoration portfolio of work.

Andy Thearle will be giving a short lecture entitled “An Introduction to Conservation, Care and Repair of Historic Ironwork”. To book in please give us a call on 01225 311273 or email ironart@ironart.co.uk.

Please share this post with your friends and colleagues, we look forward to meeting you.

Ironart CPD Event 5th May 2015

Ironart CPD Event 5th May 2015

National Heritage Ironwork Group (NHIG)

On Monday Andy and Alice went along to the AGM of the National Heritage Ironwork Group which was held in London. The NHIG objectives are to advance public knowledge and understanding of traditional ironwork and ironworking crafts, in particular through education, research and promotion of high standards.

The NHIG was set up and lauched by a small group of dedicated professionals in 2010. In four years it has grown to a committee of 17 very enthusiastic blacksmiths and heritage professionals who have come together from all corners of the UK to forward the aims of the group. The NHIG has recently been granted charity status and is looking set for some strategic changes – exciting times are ahead. More news on this when we have it.

In the meantime, if you are a blacksmith, heritage professional or simply have an enthusiasm for the conservation of important ironwork please help us to guarantee the future and support the NHIG by becoming a member today at a cost of £50 – spread the word!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lanterns at Christ Church, Julian Road, Bath

Christchurch Lantern restoration (2)

Ironart featured in the press this week when this pair of handsome lanterns were unveiled by the Bishop of Taunton, Peter Maurice, at Christ Church on Julian Road in Bath. Now Bath and The Bath Chronicle both picked up on the story because, once stripped of their paint, the lanterns were found to be peppered with bullet holes!

The team at Ironart had been commissioned by the trustees of Christ Church to restore the lanterns earlier in 2013 thanks to a generous legacy left by a Christ Church parishioner. The lanterns are of painted copper construction with traditionally made wrought iron brackets. Martin Smith who is head of restoration here at Ironart describes their style as ‘high gothic’ and dates them somewhere between 1860 – 1880. They were originally gas lanterns, and almost certainly base mounted, they had been modified from their use elsewhere to grace the front of the church. One of the lanterns has a series of bullet holes which could not have happened while they were hanging at the church due to their location on the copper crown – nobody seems to know where they came from! The ornate wrought iron brackets with which they were mounted had also been adapted, Martin believes they may have originally formed part of an overthrow-type structure. The only other similar gas lanterns Martin has seen were in Westminster, London.

Martin worked on the full restoration of these historic lanterns with National Heritage Ironwork (NHIG) student Paul Ashmore who was on a placement at Ironart for several months over the summer.  Paul and Martin paintstakingly disassembled the lanterns and made a full assessment on it’s condition and the method of repair, before restoring them to their former glory. Please follow THIS LINK to a full gallery of images of this restoration project.

If you have any questions about this or other similar projects, or have a lantern yourself and would like to discuss it’s repair – please get in touch.

Christchurch Lantern restoration (1) Christchurch Lantern restoration (3)