Walcot Steps Conservation Project

We are fortunate enough to have been commissioned to undertake another job for the World Heritage Site Enhancement Fund (WHSEF) which is a partnership between Bath and North East Somerset Council and the Bath Preservation Trust. The WHSEF aim is to initiate and organise minor enhancements to Bath’s heritage that might otherwise fall through the gaps!
 
This most recent job involved the repair and refurbishment of two sets of railings and 3 cast iron bollards that had deteriorated over the centuries at the top of the tall flight of steps joining Walcot Street to the Paragon.  As with much of this type of work this is a collaborative project and it is great to be working with our friend Andrew Ziminski and his crew from Minerva Stone Conservation. The majority of the work was undertaken on site as you can see by the images. Having been exposed to the vagaries of the weather, endless pedestrian traffic and centuries of dog messages, the work involved stabilising loose and wasted material as well as a complete overhaul of the paintwork. Wasted material was replaced with genuine wrought iron, in the spirit of using like for like material, which was fire welded onto the end of the bars. Our dog friends had significantly changed the shape of the bottom of the cast-iron posts but thankfully with such thick-walled castings, there was still plenty of sound material under the rust crust.
 
As with a lot of the railing repairs we undertake in Bath the paint layers reveal the many different colours the railings have been painted. Rarely do we find black layers except for the last layer on the top.

Another WHSEF project that you may have noticed if you are around the city of Bath is a programme of conservation of the carved street names on the Georgian buildings around the city. This street sign restoration project has just been awarded the Georgian Group Architectural Award for Streetscape Initiatives. Well done! What a lovely project! Visit their website to find out more.

BathIRON Balustrade Painting Party

The BathIRON balustrade is in its final stages of completion before installation in Parade Gardens, Bath this April.  It was galvanised in February in Newport, Wales and has been at the Ironart workshops this March, being fettled and painted. We were really happy to host a volunteer Painting Party on Sat 23rd March, where we invited volunteers to come and help us to hand paint the 300 or so musical notes.

This was a great opportunity for volunteers to come and lend a hand and see the multiple layers of process that have gone into making this amazing bespoke artwork a reality. We were delighted that people from all walks of life came down to do join us note painting, at times we had as many as 20 people painting, including three generations of one family! There is still some painting left to do, but it is great to have broken the back of it. 

We are really looking forward to seeing it installed in its final resting place in Parade Gardens, Bath.  There will be a celebration event called FireFOLK as part of the Bath Festival on the evening of the bank holiday Sunday 26th May 6 -10.30pm. Do come along and join us, you can find out more and buy your tickets here, hope to see you there.

A World Heritage Symbol for the City of Bath

We are lucky enough to be based in the beautiful City of Bath, a World Heritage City, UNESCO added Bath as a cultural site to its World Heritage List 25 years ago in 1987. To commemorate this anniversary we were commissioned by Stephen Bird, Head of Heritage Services at Bath and North East Somerset District Council (BANES) to create a large-scale World Heritage Symbol. We were delighted to be asked to make this prestigious piece, an unusual metalwork commission for the Ironart team. The brand new World Heritage Symbol is located high up in the entrance to the Roman Baths in the Pump Rooms in the centre of Bath – you really cannot miss it!

World Heritage Symbol - The Pump Rooms, Bath

Ironart's Jason, Martin & Dom - with the World Heritage Symbol, Bath

The impressive large-scale sculpture was fabricated from 2.5mm sheet steel which had been plasma cut to shape using a wooden mock-up of the finished article. We constructed it in a hollow box section and it was finished in our sprayshop in a satin gold paint before being carefully transported to site by the Ironart team.  Let us know if you visit the Roman Baths and spot it, we’d love to hear what you think!